COMMUNICATION
QUICK LINKS
NEWS
EVENTS
MEDIA RELATIONS
CONSUMER HEALTH NEWS
MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATIONS
PUBLICATIONS
Ohio University Medicine
Memory Book for Graduates
Viewbook (PDF)
Catalog (PDF)
DESIGN SERVICES
Project Initiation Form
Exhibits / Displays
OU-HCOM Logo and Seal
STAFF / CONTACTS
COMMUNICATION POLICIES
COMMUNICATION HOME
   
 

 

Ohio child safety seat law changes

OU-HCOM, Patrol to provide free child safety seat checks

 

By Richard Heck

September 2, 2009

 

A new state law that takes effect next month means children will ride in car seats longer.

 

The legislation requires every child younger than eight years of age and/or shorter than 4 feet 9 inches ride in a federally approved car
safety seat. Signed into law in January, the regulations take effect Oct. 7, although the law provides for a six-month warning period through April 2010.

 

To assist parents and caregivers with the new regulations, the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine (OU-HCOM) and the Athens Post of the State Highway Patrol will observe National Seat Check Saturday on Sept. 12 to offer free advice on how to correctly install and use the seats.

 

Mary McPherson, nurse coordinator for OU-HCOM’s Community Health Programs, explains that “child safety seats” include infant seats, convertible seats, forward-facing seats, booster seats and other federally approved safety devices for moving vehicles.

 

Previously, Ohio law required children under the age of four and weighing less than 40 pounds to ride in a safety seat appropriate for the child’s age and weight. The new state law mirrors current safety organizations’ recommendations.

 

While nearly all infants and 90 percent of children aged one to three routinely ride in safety seats, only 37 percent of children aged four to eight do, according to a study by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Since children aged four to eight are more likely to die in motor-vehicle crashes than from any other cause, increasing the use of child safety seats among this age group is critically important, McPherson said.

 

“It’s the responsibility of every parent and caregiver to make sure their children are safely restrained, every trip, every time,” McPherson said. “We are urging everyone to get their child safety seats inspected.  When it comes to the safety of a child, there is no room for mistakes.”

 

The local seat check will take place in the parking lot of the Lowe’s hardware store on East State Street in Athens on Saturday, Sept. 12, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There parents and caregivers can receive guidance on how to correctly secure a child in an appropriate  safety seat.
 

Booster seats reduce the odds of significant injury during a crash by about 60 percent for children aged four to seven, according to a 2003 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Both the American Automobile Association (AAA) and the NHTSA recommend that children use booster seats until the vehicle’s lap and shoulder belt can fit them properly—typically when they are at least eight years -old or approximately 4 feet, 9 inches tall.

 

For information on Child Passenger Safety Week, visit www.nhtsa.gov/cps.

 
 
 
EDUCATION RESEARCH COMMUNITY DIVERSITY HOME
 
  Ohio University
Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine
Grosvenor Hall, Athens, Ohio 45701
Tel:
740-593-2202
Last updated: 09/14/2011